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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Sá,Isabel Valéria Abalem de; Solari,Claude André (2001)
Publisher: Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Salmonella, pet reptiles
The presence of salmonellae in fecal samples or cloacal swabs of 97 pet reptiles (15 snakes, 24 lizards and 58 chelonians) was investigated. Thirty seven animals had national origin and 60 were imported. Salmonella spp was detected in 39.1% of the reptiles, being 62.5% in lizards, 53.3% in snakes and 25.8% in chelonians. Strains belonged to subspecies I (44.7%), II (10.5%), IIIa (5.2%), IIIb (21.0%) and IV (18.5%) of the enterica species, with predominance (55.3%) of subspecies usually found in cold-blooded animals (II to IV). In the subspecies I, the serovars Albany, Enteritidis and Typhimurium predominated. The Trachemys scripta elegans imported turtles corresponded to 93.3% (14/15) of the salmonellae-positive chelonians. The national iguanas presented a high rate of colonization (77.7% - 7/9). These animals pose a potencial risk to the human health, demanding sanitary control and more information to the public.