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Olatunji, Cyril-Mary P (2013)
Publisher: Purdue University
Types: Article
Subjects: American Studies, Arts and Humanities, Comparative Literature, Education, European Languages and Societies, Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Film and Media Studies, Other Arts and Humanities, Other Film and Media Studies, Reading and Language, Rhetoric and Composition, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Television, Theatre and Performance Studies
In his article "An Argument for Gender Equality in Africa" Cyril-Mary P. Olatunji addresses the problematics of gender inequality in Black African society. Many scholars working on African Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures have had something to say about the treatment of women and the topic of gender inequality in Africa. Some suggest(ed) that the roots of women's oppression are to be sought in customs and traditions and so despite of a legal system that guarantees women rights in Africa. Olatunji's objective is to advance the current discussion on the issue using the method of simple philosophical analysis, an argument from a legitimately African origin proposing a re-examination of the widespread belief among Afro-critics, as well as Afro-apologetic scholars that treatment of women as second class or inferior folk is indigenous to Africa.
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