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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Chan, Gail; Mooney, David J. (2013)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Article
Identifiers:pmc:PMC3867449
In general, alginate hydrogels are considered to be biologically inert and are commonly used for biomedical purposes that require minimum inflammation. However, Ca2+, which is commonly used to crosslink alginate, is a critical second messenger in immune cell signaling, and little has been done to understand its effect on immune cell fate when delivered as a component of alginate gels. We found that dendritic cells (DCs) encapsulated in Ca2+-crosslinked alginate (calcium alginate) secreted at least fivefold more of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β when compared to DCs encapsulated in agarose and collagen gels, as well as DCs plated on tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). Plating cells on TCPS with the alginate polymer could not reproduce these results, whereas culturing DCs on TCPS with increasing concentrations of Ca2+ increased IL-1β, MHC class II and CD86 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In agreement with these findings, calcium alginate gels induced greater maturation of encapsulated DCs compared to barium alginate gels. When injected subcutaneously in mice, calcium alginate gels significantly upregulated IL-1β secretion from surrounding tissue relative to barium alginate gels, and similarly, the inflammatory effects of LPS were enhanced when it was delivered from calcium alginate gels rather than barium alginate gels. These results confirm that the Ca2+ used to crosslink alginate gels can be immunostimulatory and suggest that it is important to take into account Ca2+’s bioactive effects on all exposed cells (both immune and non-immune) when using calcium alginate gels for biomedical purposes. This work may strongly impact the way people use alginate gels in the future as well as provide insights into past work utilizing alginate gels.
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