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Gyasi-Sarpong, Christian Kofi; Maison, Patrick Opoku Manu; Morhe, Emmanuel; Aboah, Ken; Appiah, Kwaku Addai-Arhin; Azorliade, Roland; Baah-Nyamekye, Kofi; Otu-Boateng, Kwaku; Amoah, George; Antwi, Isaac; Frimpong-Twumasi, Benjamin; Arthur, Douglas (2016)
Publisher: BioMed Central
Journal: BMC Research Notes
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Intrauterine contraceptive device, Intravesical migration, Case Report, UTI
Background Intrauterine contraceptive device is the most common method of reversible contraception in women. The intrauterine contraceptive device can perforate the uterus and can also migrate into pelvic or abdominal organs. Perforation of the urinary bladder by an intrauterine contraceptive device is not common. In West Africa, intravesical migration of an intrauterine contraceptive device has been rarely reported. In this report, we present a case of an intrauterine contraceptive device migration into the urinary bladder of a 33?year old African woman at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana. Case report A 33?year old African woman presented with persistent urinary tract infection of 7?months duration despite appropriate antibiotic treatments. An abdominal ultrasonography revealed a urinary bladder calculus which was found to be an intrauterine contraceptive device on removal at cystoscopy. She got pregnant whilst having the intrauterine contraceptive device in place and delivered at term. Conclusion The presence of recurrent or persistent urinary tract infection in any woman with an intrauterine contraceptive device should raise the suspicion of intravesical migration of the intrauterine contraceptive device.

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