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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Chen, R H; Lipsick, J S (1993)
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Research Article

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: animal structures, fungi
Identifiers:pmc:PMC360011
The v-myb oncogene and its cellular homolog c-myb encode sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins which regulate transcription from promoters containing Myb-binding sites in animal cells. We have developed a Saccharomyces cerevisiae system to assay transcriptional activation by v-Myb and c-Myb. In yeast strains containing integrated reporter genes, activation was strictly dependent upon both the Myb DNA-binding domain and the Myb recognition element. BAS1, an endogenous Myb-related yeast protein, was not required for transactivation by animal Myb proteins and by itself had no detectable effect on a Myb reporter gene. Deletion analyses demonstrated that a domain of v-Myb C terminal to the previously mapped Myb transcriptional activation domain was required for transactivation in animal cells but not in S. cerevisiae. The same domain is also required for the efficient transformation of myeloid cells by v-Myb. In contrast to results in animal cells, in S. cerevisiae the full-length c-Myb was a much stronger transactivator than a protein bearing the oncogenic N- and C-terminal truncations of v-Myb. These results imply that negative regulation of c-Myb by its own termini requires an additional animal cell protein or small molecule that is not present in S. cerevisiae.
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