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Kayama, Hisako; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi (2013)
Publisher: The Korean Association of Immunologists
Journal: Immune Network
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Review Article, Innate immunity, IBD, Intestinal homeostasis

Classified by OpenAIRE into

mesheuropmc: biochemical phenomena, metabolism, and nutrition, chemical and pharmacologic phenomena, bacteria, animal diseases
The intestinal immune system has an ability to distinguish between the microbiota and pathogenic bacteria, and then activate pro-inflammatory pathways against pathogens for host defense while remaining unresponsive to the microbiota and dietary antigens. In the intestine, abnormal activation of innate immunity causes development of several inflammatory disorders such as inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Thus, activity of innate immunity is finely regulated in the intestine. To date, multiple innate immune cells have been shown to maintain gut homeostasis by preventing inadequate adaptive immune responses in the murine intestine. Additionally, several innate immune subsets, which promote Th1 and Th17 responses and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IBD, have recently been identified in the human intestinal mucosa. The demonstration of both murine and human intestinal innate immune subsets contributing to regulation of adaptive immunity emphasizes the conserved innate immune functions across species and might promote development of the intestinal innate immunity-based clinical therapy.

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