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fbtwitterlinkedinvimeoflicker grey 14rssslideshare1
Languages: English
Types: Article
Subjects: Applied Environmental and Public Health Microbiology
Identifiers:pmc:PMC184408
Three isomers of pyridinedicarboxylic acid (PDCA) (2,3-, 2,5-, and 2,6-PDCA) were partially oxidized by marine bacteria when grown aerobically on the corresponding phthalate analogs. The metabolites, unlike the parent PDCAs, absorbed light in the solar actinic range (wavelengths greater than 300 nm) and were readily degraded in sunlight. The principal product from 2,6-PDCA (dipicolinic acid) metabolism was extracted from a culture fluid, purified by column chromatography, and analyzed by UV-visible, infrared, and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The compound was identified as 2,3-dihydroxypicolinic acid (2,3-DHPA). 2,3-DHPA was photolyzed in aqueous solution (pH 8.0) with a half-life of 100 min. Eight photoproducts, three of which were photolabile, were detected by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ammonia was also photoproduced from 2,3-DHPA. Analysis of the photoproducts by UV-visible spectroscopy and by high-performance liquid chromatography of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazones indicated that the products were conjugated carbonyls and carboxylic acids. Six of the photoproducts were readily consumed by bacterial strain CC9M. In illuminated aquatic environments, coupled bio- and photodegradative mechanisms probably contribute to the degradation of PDCAs.
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