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FAQ

faq1Check out our most frequent questions. If you cannot find an answer to your question, please contact us through our helpdesk.


General Info

generalinfo2The basics about Open Access and how you can participate.

1 - What is Open Access policy of the EC and the ERC?

Horizon 2020


In Horizon 2020 Open Access to Scientific Peer Reviewed Publications has been anchored as an ‘underlying principle’, which means that it has become obligatory for all projects.

 

FP7

In FP7, there was an Open Access Pilot for publications, applicable for approximately 20 % of the budget and in 7 dedicated research areas.  During the run of FP7, the European Commission had two policies on open access in practice, the EC Open Access Pilot and the ERC guidelines for Open Access. These initiatives require that the researcher provides open access to articles resulting from EC funded research, within a specified time period.




2 - What is Open Access?

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Open Access is the immediateonlinefree availability of research outputs without restrictions on use commonly imposed by publisher copyright agreements. Open Access includes the outputs that scholars normally give away for free for publication; it includes peer-reviewed journal articles, conference papers and datasets of various kinds.

Access to knowledge, information, and data is essential in higher education and research; and more generally, for sustained progress in society. Improved access is the basis for the transfer of knowledge (teaching), knowledge generation (research), and knowledge valorization (civil society).

Providing Open Access to research, both research papers and (the underlying) datasets, is not only beneficial for the public, but also for the researchers: several studies indicate that openness increases citations. Openness also improves reproducibility of your research results – and it might introduce new and perhaps unexpected audiences to your work.
 

More information: 

Open Access Overview

 

3 - How can I make my work Open ?

There are two main, non-exclusive ways of making publications and data Open : through self-archiving in repositories  or through publishing in  Open Access journals .

Publishing in an Open Access Journal : you can find a list of reliable Open Access journals in the DOAJ. If the publisher asks for an author fee (also: ‘article processing charge’ or APC), you can declare this an eligible cost in your project budget. Some Open Access Journals offer you the option of archiving the underlying data of an article you submit as well, and there are even journals who only publish datasets and their metadata. 

By self-archiving their work in digital archives or repositories (‘depositing’), researchers can make their publication or data Open Access, even if the final published version of their work is not.  This is possible even if you have assigned the copyright to your publisher (although the assignment of your rights is often negotiable when you ask your publisher about it). Some repositories only accept publications, but in other repositories you can also deposit datasets, whether they're connected with a publication or not.  

Open Access is compatible with copyright, peer review, preservation, prestige, quality, career-advancement, indexing, and other features and supportive services associated with conventional scholarly literature.

In its Open Access policy for Horizon 2020, the European Commission explicitly asks to deposit the work in a repository and make it Open Access (after an embargo if necessary) – regardless of whether it has been published in an Open Access Journal or not.

A novelty in Horizon 2020 is the Open Research Data Pilot which aims to improve and maximize access to and re-use of research data generated by projects. It will be monitored with a view to developing the European Commission policy on open research data in future Framework Programmes.

 

 

4 - What is an Open Access Journal?

One way of providing Open Access is to publish in an Open Access Journal. These journals make their articles available for free by funding their publication services in other ways than through end-user subscriptions. A lot of journals fund their workings by charging Article Processing Charges (APCs), although not all publishers do and there exist huge variations in the actual amount of the APC.

A lot of traditional journals also offer the possibility of making individual articles Open Access upon payment of an APC (in this case they are called hybrid journals). Unfortunately, while the individual article thus becomes freely available, the journal as a whole remains closed access.

APCs can be included in the costs of research funding, so the money for access comes through the research funder, rather than through the library budget. Of course, the initial source of the money is often the same (from government funding).

There is a growing number of Open Access Journals; most disciplines are now represented. A comprehensive overview is provided by the Directory of Open Access Journals, DOAJ.

Some Open Access Journals offer you the option of archiving the underlying data of an article you submit as well, and there are even journals who only publish datasets and their metadata.

 
 

5 - What are repositories?

An Open Access repository is a database or a virtual archive established to collect, disseminate and preserve scientific output like scientific articles and datasets and make them freely available. The action of depositing material in a repository is (self)archiving. Depending on personal preferences or publisher's policies, the author can make his work available in Open Access or (temporarily) restrict the access to it.

Repositories can be either linked to an institution or department or linked to a research field or subject, i.e. Institutional or Subject Repositories.

When using the OpenAIRE deposit service you will be guided through the steps of deposition and also if possible guided to a relevant repository (check out the list of compatible repositories). OpenAIRE uses data from the Directory of Open Access Repositories, OpenDOAR, and from the Registry of Research Data Repositories, Re3data

  • Subject based repositories are repositories oriented for research output from one or more well defined research domains. Classic examples are ArXiv and Europe Europe PubMed Central. All researchers working in certain subject areas can make use of subject repositories – regardless of their affiliation or geographic location.
  • Institutional Repositories are repositories that are maintained and curated by institutions - very often the library. Repositories collect, curate and make the research output of an institutions available on the Internet. As a rule, depositing is only possible for researchers affiliated with the institution.
  • A data repository is a digital archive collecting and displaying datasets and their metadata. A lot of data repositories also accept publications, and allow linking these publications to the underlying data. Some examples are Zenodo, DRYAD, Figshare.

Overview of repositories can be found on ROAR, OpenDOAR, Re3data.

Please visit the OpenAIRE helpdesk  if you are having trouble finding the best suited repository for you. If you do not have a repository to deposit your article in then you can use the Zenodo repository, hosted by CERN.

6 - What are the legal issues?

Open Access is not an infringement on copyright and making your work Open Access is perfectly legal.

Authors own the original copyright to papers they write, and publishers need their permission to publish the paper. In author-publisher contracts, publishers often ask for transfer of the copyright, sometimes even when the paper is first submitted to the journal. However, authors can always choose to retain their copyright and provide the publisher with a license to publish.

Even when the author has signed away author’s rights, it is still possible to provide open access through self-archiving the work in a repository. The Sherpa/RoMEO site offers an overview of official publishers’ policies about self-archiving.

If you want to know more about copyright in relation to open access:

If you have other questions related to Intellectual Property Rights

EU IPR Helpdesk Logo may 2013 version
The  European IPR Helpdesk is the official IP service initiative of the European Commission providing free-of-charge, first-line advice and information on Intellectual Property (IP) and Intellectual Property Rights (IPR).The service is targeted at researchers and European small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) participating in EU-funded collaborative research projects. In addition it addresses SMEs involved in international technology transfer processes.

 If you need assistance on a specific IPR issue, or would like to be informed about the latest developments in the world of IP and R&D in Europe, or if you are interested in training on IPR – the European IPR Helpdesk is the right partner to contact.

 

7 - Which version of my work should I deposit?

Either one of the documents described below should be deposited in an institutional or subject repository upon acceptance for publication:

  • Published version: when the article is made Open Access upon publication, you should deposit this publisher’s final version of the paper, including all modifications from the peer review process, copyediting and stylistic edits, and formatting changes (usually a PDF document) or
  • Final manuscript accepted for publication: final manuscript of a peer-reviewed paper accepted for journal publication, including all modifications from the peer review process, but not yet formatted by the publisher (also referred to as ‘post-print version’).

A postprint is the version of the scientific paper that has received full peer review but has not yet been put in the final published layout. In terms of content, post-prints are the article as published. However, in terms of appearance this might not be the same as the published article, as publishers often reserve for themselves their own arrangement of type-setting and formatting. A lot of publishers allow the postprint version to be put in Open Access.

If unsure whether the version you want to deposit version can be made Open Access, the SHERPA/RoMEO website is a useful tool.

8 - Is an embargo or delay allowed when making my work Open?

Reasonable embargoes of 6 months (STEM) and 12 months (SSH) are allowed if necessary. 

Each beneficiary from an Horizon 2020 grant must deposit the work in a repository as soon as possible and at the latest on publication.
Each beneficiary must ensure Open Access to the deposited publication — via the repository — at the latest:

  • at the moment of publication, if an electronic version is available for free via the publisher (either the published version or the final manuscript)  
  • within six months after publication for STEM publications and twelve months for SSH publications

Related Documents:

Fact Sheet: Open Access in Horizon 2020
Fact Sheet for Project Officers in Horizon 2020
Fact Sheet for Project Coordinators in Horizon 2020
Guidelines on Open Access to Scientific Publications and Research Data in Horizon 2020
Multi-beneficiary General Model Grant Agreement

 

9 - What should I do if the publisher does not allow me to archive my article?

In a small amount of cases, the publisher does not allow any version of the work being made Open Access.  Check Sherpa RoMEO for publishers’ policies on this matter. In the vast majority of cases, publishers allow some form of self-archiving, if necessary after an embargo period.

If the publisher doesn’t allow you to deposit your article in a repository, the EC Open Access policy requires the author to contact the publisher. You are requested to inform the publisher of the EC Open Access requirements, and ask for an exception to the publisher’s normal policy to enable you to meet those requirements. It is important to obtain this permission in writing. A Template letter (.pdf) is available that can be used when writing to the publisher asking for an amendment to your publishing agreement.

 

Relevant Documents

Template letter (.pdf)

MORE

EC-Resources 

10 - I have already got my material on my website. Do I need a repository?

Yes! Most digital repositories are compliant with technical standards that enable cross-archive searching (Open Archives Initiative’s Protocol for Metadata Harvesting OAI-PMH). Thus, research output placed in a repository is far easier to find than through an individual's website. Several search engines such as Google or Google Scholar favour OAI-repository material, and display these results more prominently. Moreover, repositories are working to preserve materials in the long-term. The benefit is that if a researcher moves on, or their personal website changes, their research output remains in a repository - and the links - will remain stable, readable and accessible. 

11 - Where can I find a suitable repository?

If your institution doesn’t have an institutional repository and if there is no relevant subject repository you can deposit your research output – this can be articles or datasets -  in ZENODO, a repository hosted by CERN and available to all. Some journal archives are also harvested by OpenAIRE, so you might want to consider publishing your research with them.

You can use the OpenAIRE deposit service - check out the list of compatible repositories.

OpenAIRE uses data from the Directory of Open Access Repositories, OpenDOAR, and from the Registry of Research Data Repositories, Re3data. Overview of repositories can be found on ROAR, OpenDOAR, Re3data.

Go to the OpenAIRE helpdesk ”Ask a question” if you are having trouble finding the best suited repository for you. 

12 - What is the Open Data Pilot in Horizon2020?

A novelty in Horizon 2020 is the Open Research Data Pilot which aims to improve and maximize access to and re-use of research data generated by projects. It will be monitored with a view to developing the European Commission policy on open research data in future Framework Programmes.

You can deposit your data in dedicated data repositories. Some repositories, such as Zenodo, accept both publications and datasets. Data repositories allow you to provide persistent links to your datasets, so that they can be cited, linked and tracked. This also allows for version control. Just like publications, you can license your data to make clear what level of reuse you will allow for your dataset. To find a suitable repository, see re3data.  
 
Related Documents:

13 - What is 'Open Research Data' ?

Research data can be extremely diverse: from spreadsheets, audio-visual materials, databases, to 3D-models and result lists from large experiments. Sizes may vary from a couple of small files related to a specific publication (‘long tail of research data’) to vast collections of experimental results (‘big data’), that can only be processed using specialized programmes. 

The need for adequate documentation and description is obvious, as reproducibility is the key factor when it comes to scientific research. Specialized repositories, such as Zenodo, have been established to collect and preserve datasets of all kinds, and possibly linking them to publications and projects related to the creation of the set. Collecting, describing, licensing and preserving data proves to be a big challenge, and experience with Research Data Management quickly becoming a sought-after asset for researchers and supporting staff.

Open Knowledge Foundation has defined Open Data in ‘The Open Definition’, as "machine-readable, available in bulk, and provided in an open format (i.e., a format with a freely available published specification which places no restrictions, monetary or otherwise, upon its use) or, at the very least, can be processed with at least one free/libre/open-source software tool."

See also: OpenAIRE Open Research Data Pilot Factsheet.


For Researchers

Researchers-IconWhat you need to do to deposit Open Access and comply with funder mandates.

14 - How is my project visible on OpenAIRE?

By depositing your work in a repository and adding project information to the metadata, project information and related publications and data will autmatically become visible on the OpenAIRE portal.

When relevant project information is added to the metadata, OpenAIRE can harvest this research output from repositories and makes them visible on the OpenAIRE portal. On this portal, each project has a dedicated page featuring:

  • Project information
  • App & Widget box
  • Publication list
  • Datasets
  • Author information

When the research output is available in Open Access, users can access them directly through the portal.

Remember that by making at least one version of your work Open Access – even if it doesn’t have the publisher’s layout – has immense influence on the visibility of your work!

A majority of publishers allow you to deposit an Open Access version of your work in a repository, even if the journal is not Open Access! If unsure whether the deposited version can be made Open Access, the SHERPA/RoMEO website is a useful tool.

15 - How can I edit or remove a record on OpenAIRE?

OpenAIRE does not create content, but aggregates content (publications and data) from other sources.
  • If you have deposited your publication or dataset in a repository, you should contact the administrator of the specific repository
  • If you haven't deposited the publication or dataset yourself, or if you don't know how the record ended up on the OpenAIRE portal, contact the OpenAIRE helpdesk

16 - Where can I find a suitable repository?

 Open Access Repositories can be either linked to an institution or department or linked to a research field or subject, i.e. Institutional or Subject Repositories.

When using the OpenAIRE deposit service you will be guided through the steps of deposition and also if possible guided to a relevant repository. OpenAIRE uses data from the Directory of Open Access Repositories, OpenDOAR.

 Publisher's policies relating to self-archiving can be checked at the SHERPA/RoMEO website.

There are several resources to find repositories:

 !!! OpenDOAR and thus OpenAIRE may not be comprehensive. Go to the OpenAIRE helpdesk if you are having trouble finding a suitable repository.

You can also use ZENODO, the former OpenAIRE 'Orphan Repository'. ZENODO is hosted by CERN and accepts both publications and datasets.

Some journal publishers also have agreements with OpenAIRE and allow harvesting from their archives. Check with your publishers to find out if they participate.

 

17 - How can I make research data Open Access?

You can deposit your data in dedicated data repositories. Some repositories, such as Zenodo, accept both publications and datasets. Data repositories allow you to provide persistent links to your datasets, so that they can be cited, linked and tracked. This also allows for version control. Just like publications, you can license your data to make clear what level of reuse you will allow for your dataset. OpenAIRE recommends to use the Creative Commons CC0 Waiver or CC-BY licence for open access to data.


Overviews of data repositories can be found on re3data.org. It is recommended to select a certified so-called Trustworthy Data Repository, when this is available in your discipline.


More information about Research Data Management (RDM) and making your data open:

18 - Why make my work Open Access?

The central idea behind Open Access is that the results of publicly financed research should be available to the public – citizens, SMEs, researchers at other institutions, medicine staff, journalists, teachers, …

Access to knowledge, information, and data is essential in higher education and research; and more generally, for sustained progress in society. Improved access is the basis for the transfer of knowledge (teaching), knowledge generation (research), and knowledge valorization (civil society).

Providing Open Access to research, both research papers and (the underlying) datasets, is not only beneficial for the public, but also for the researchers: several studies indicate that openness increases citations. Openness also improves reproducibility of your research results – and it might introduce new and perhaps unexpected audiences to your work.

For more information on Open Access, visit our dedicated page.

Useful information: The Open Access Citation Advantage

 

19 - What to deposit?

Either one of the documents described below should be deposited in an institutional or subject repository upon acceptance for publication:
  • Published version: publisher’s final version of the paper, including all modifications from the peer review process, copyediting and stylistic edits, and formatting changes (usually a PDF document) or
  • Final manuscript accepted for publication: final manuscript of a peer-reviewed paper accepted for journal publication, including all modifications from the peer review process, but not yet formatted by the publisher (also referred to as post-print version).

When your project is part of the Open Research Data Pilot, you should also deposit the data (and metadata) needed to validate results in your scientific publications, and other curated and/or raw data (and metadata) that you specify in your Data Management Plan.

20 - What is OpenAIRE and how can I participate?

The FP7 project OpenAIRE aimed to support the implementation of Open Access in Europe. It provides the means to promote and realize the widespread adoption of the Open Access Policy, as set out by the ERC Scientific Council Guidelines for Open Access and the Open Access pilot launched by the European Commission.

Its successors OpenAIREplus was aimed at linking the aggregated research publications to the accompanying research and project information, datasets and author information. The goal is to make through the portal www.openaire.eu, as much European funded research output as possible available to all.

This research output, whether it is publications, datasets or project information is not only accessible through the OpenAIRE portal, extra functionalities are also offered, such as statistics, reporting tools and widgets – making OpenAIRE a useful support service for researchers, coordinators and project managers.

OpenAIRE relies heavily on a decentralized structure where there is a representation in all member states (the so-called NOADs or National Open Access Desks) who can give specialized advice. If you have a question about a country-specific situation, you can contact them.

Researchers working for European funded projects can participate by depositing their research output in their own repository, publish with participating journals or deposit directly in the OpenAIRE repository ZENODO– and indicating the project it belongs to in the metadata.

Dedicated pages per project are visible on the OpenAIRE portal.

OpenAIRE’s three main objectives are to

  1. build support structures for researchers in depositing FP7 research publications through the establishment of the European Helpdesk and the outreach to all European member states through the operation and collaboration of 27 National Open Access Desks;

  2. establish and operate an electronic infrastructure for handling peer-reviewed articles as well as other important forms of publications (pre-prints or conference publications). This is achieved through  a portal that is the gateway to all user-level services offered by the e-Infrastructure established, including access (search and browse) to scientific publications and other value-added functionality (post authoring tools, monitoring tools through analysis of document and usage statistics);

  3.  work with several subject communities to explore the requirements, practices, incentives, workflows, data models, and technologies to deposit, access, and combine research datasets of various forms in combination with research publications.

50 partners, from all EU countries, and beyond, work on OpenAIRE2020 project that aims to promote open scholarship and substantially improve the discoverability and reusability of research publications and data. The initiative brings together professionals from research libraries, open scholarship organisations, national e-Infrastructure and data experts, IT and legal researchers, showcasing the truly collaborative nature of this pan-European endeavor. A network of people, represented by the National Open Access Desks (NOADs), will organise activities to collect H2020 project outputs, and support research data management. Backing this vast outreach, is the OpenAIRE platform, the technical infrastructure that is vital for pulling together and interconnecting the large-scale collections of research outputs across Europe. The project will create workflows and services on top of this valuable repository content, which will enable an interoperable network of repositories (via the adoption of common guidelines), and easy upload into an all-purpose repository (via Zenodo).

OpenAIRE2020 will assist in monitoring H2020 research outputs and will be a key infrastructure for reporting H2020’s scientific publications as it will be loosely coupled to the EC’s IT backend systems. The EC’s Research Data Pilot will be supported through European-wide outreachfor best research data management practices and Zenodo, which will provide long-tail data storage. Other activities include: collaboration with national funders to reinforce the infrastructure’s research analytic services; an APC Gold OA pilot for FP7 publications with collaboration from LIBER; novel methods of review and scientific publishing withthe involvement of hypotheses.org; a study and a pilot on scientific indicators related to open access with CWTS’s assistance; legal studies to investigate data privacy issues relevant to the Open Data Pilot; international alignment with related networks elsewhere with the involvement of COAR.

21 - What should I do if the publisher does not allow me to archive my article?

In a small amount of cases, the publisher does not allow any version of the work being made Open Access (this is seldom the case, check Sherpa RoMEO for publishers’ policies on self-archiving).

If the publisher doesn’t allow you to deposit your article in a repository, the EC Open Access policy requires the author to contact the publisher. You are requested to inform the publisher of the EC Open Access requirements, and ask for an exception to the publisher’s normal policy to enable you to meet those requirements. It is important to obtain this permission in writing. A Template Letter (.pdf) is available that can be used when writing to the publisher asking for an amendment to your publishing agreement. When writing to publishers, it is better to write to the editor or officer in charge of authors' rights if possible, rather than to a general publisher's email address for permissions for re-use of published material. It is important that the request be seen as coming from the author and is part of the publisher/author relationship.

RELEVANT DOCUMENTS
Template letter (.pdf)


MORE
EC-Resources 

 

22 - My institution does not have a repository, where can I find one?

There are several resources to find repositories:

OpenDOAR and thus OpenAIRE may not be comprehensive. Go to the OpenAIRE helpdesk "Ask a question" if you are having trouble finding a suitable repository. You can also use ZENODO, the former OpenAIRE 'Orphan Repository'. ZENODO is hosted by CERN and accepts both publications and datasets.

23 - What is a License to Publish?

A License to Publish is a publishing agreement between author and publisher. Unlike many publishing agreements, it does not transfer the author's copyright to the publisher. Instead, the author retains his copyright and grants the publisher a "sole license to reproduce and communicate the scholarly work and certain other rights needed for publishing". It leaves the author the right to archive his article in an Open Access repository. The JISC/SURF Copyright Toolbox provides a model license. 
 
If, furthermore, you would like to ensure that others can be granted further rights for the use and reuse your work, you may ask the publisher to:
* immediately release your work under a Creative Commons license, or
* limit the term of exclusive rights and to release your work under a Creative Commons license afterwards.
These options can be included in your License to Publish.
Several publishers already combine a License to Publish with Creative Commons licencing. Some  require article processing fees to release your work under such terms. These fees can be paid out of the project budget and are fully eligible for reimbursement within the project period.

24 - I have already got my material on my website. Do I need a repository?

Yes! Most digital repositories are compliant with technical standards that enable cross-archive searching (Open Archives Initiative’s Protocol for Metadata Harvesting OAI-PMH).
 
A publication or dataset placed in a repository is far easier to find than through an individual's website. Several search engines such as Google or Google Scholar favour OAI-repository material, and display these results more prominently. Moreover, repositories are working to preserve materials in the long-term. The benefit is that if a researcher moves on, or their personal website changes, their publications and data are in a repository - and the links - will remain stable, readable and accessible.

Publisher's policies relating to self-archiving can be found at the SHERPA/RoMEO website.

There are several resources to find repositories:

25 - What about version-control? Will there be one version in a repository and a different published version?

The EC Open Access policies and ERC Guidelines ask for either the final manuscript or the published version of the article to be made available for Open Access. Most deposited versions are the author's final version - the version after peer-review, after revision and checking - that is, the version sent to the publisher for printing. Some publishers allow the use of the final PDF file which contains their layout and style of font - in which case the versions are identical. Otherwise, while the style of the font might be different, the text of the repository version is identical except for any minor copy-editing done by the publisher after it leaves the author's hands.

26 - Where can I find the publisher policies on open access and self-archiving?

You can use the database SHERPA/RoMEO to find the vast majority of scholarly journals and publishers standard archiving policies. The SHERPA/RoMEO database uses colour codes to give the user an easy and quick overview of the different policies of journals.


For Data Providers

Data-Providers-IconWhy and how to make your repository compatible with OpenAIRE.

27 - What can I do to ensure and improve OpenAIRE compatibility?

Carefully analyse the proper version of the OpenAIRE guidelines, especially the metadata and vocabulary application profile, OAI-PMH usage instructions and available examples, and search for useful info about OpenAIRE compatibility improvements for your software repository platform.

Your repository should be registered in OpenDOAR. If needed, you can request an update of the name of your repository, supported languages, OAI-BaseURL, administrative contact email. Using the OpenAIRE validator service you can update the OpenAIRE guidelines compatibility level and information about the OAI-BaseURl and OAI-Sets OpenAIRE should harvest from.

For more comprehensive support, please access the recordings and slides from the last webinars on OpenAIRE compatibility for repository platforms: Proprietary platforms: slides & recordings; EPrints platforms: slides & recordings; DSpace platforms: slides & recordings (access also to the slides on the OR2014 conference workshop).

28 - What if my repository is not OpenAIRE compliant?

This means that the publications deposited in the repository will not be 'harvested' automatically through the OpenAIRE portal, limiting the visibility of your project and access to the services OpenAIRE offers.  

The OpenAIRE portal is designed to measure compliance with the EC's and ERC's Open Acces policies and pilots. When as a project you are required to comply with these conditions, OpenAIRE is there to make the reporting easy. While non-compliant repositories are still being indexed through the OpenAIRE system, the visibility and accuracy of project files and publication metadata can be less. 

29 - Do I need to adapt my repository?

In order for OpenAIRE to harvest and connect publications to the related EC FP7/H2020 grant aggreement and to calculate the share of Open Access versus non-Open Access publications we do require repositories to adapt to the OpenAIRE Guidelines. These are low-barrier requirements for OAI-PMH compliant repositories that builds on oai_dc and the DRIVER Guidelines.

 

30 - What are the OpenAIRE Guidelines?

The OpenAIRE Guidelines are simple metadata specifications for repositories that need to be OpenAIRE compliant. After complying to the OpenAIRE guidelines, the repository will become the single entry point for researchers that want to deposit FP7 publications.

31 - How do I make my repository OpenAIRE-compliant?

The OpenAIRE Guidelines for repository managers give an overview of the requirements in order to make your repository compliant.

32 - Are there any standard repository software that are OpenAIRE compliant ?

Yes, at the moment major repository applications like DSpace, EPrints are OpenAIRE compliant, as are a number of national and local systems. Moreover the Open Journal Systems, used by thousands of journals around the world, is OpenAIRE compliant.

33 - What do I need to do before registering my repository as OpenAIRE compliant?

Please make sure you have an ec_fundedresources set and that it contains at least one record. If unsure, please contact the OpenAIRE Helpdesk.

34 - I have an non-empty ec_fundedresources record but the validation still fails.

Please make sure that you have set up correctly your ListIdentifiers and GetRecord verbs for your ec_fundedresources records. If unsure, please contact the OpenAIRE Helpdesk.

35 - My repository is not shown in the validator's OpenDOAR list or is not part of OpenDOAR. What can I do?

For the time being, only OpenDOAR repositories may register in OpenAIRE. If your repository is in OpenDOAR but is not shown in the validator's list, please contact us through the OpenAIRE Helpdesk.

36 - What is OAI-PMH?

OAI-PMH (Open Archives Initiative’s Protocol for Metadata Harvesting OAI-PMH) is a set of rules and methods that standardize the access to the content of repositories. The OpenAIRE Guidelines builds on OAI-PMH v.2.0

37 - How can I find directions and recommendations on setting up a repository?

There are several guides on setting up repositories - we recommend the  DRIVER Guidelines.

38 - How often is an OpenAIRE compliant repository harvested?

The standard frequency is once a week.

For Research Managers

Research-Administrators-Icon orangeFind out how to use OpenAIRE to your advantage.

39 - How can OpenAIRE help with progress or final reporting?

OpenAIRE provides you with a publications reporting tool available in the project landing page of the portal. For each project OpenAIRE suggests a list of scientific outputs (publications and data) that you can view and export in a csv or html form.

Using this aggregated project output – identifying title, author, year, access mode and permanent link – you can easily fill the corresponding information in the progress or final report of your project.

Additionally, and if you didn’t find all the publications in the list, you can easily claim them linking publications to your projects.


For Funding Agencies

Funding-Agencies-IconFind out how to align to European policies and use the OpenAIRE services.

40 - Where to find guidelines for Open Access policy development for Funding Organizations?

The Guidelines for implementing Open Access policies, released  on December 2013 and produced by the EC-funded project “Mediterranean Open Access Network” (www.medoanet.eu) provides a concise and targeted guidance for a harmonized approach towards policy development.

Amongst other targeted guidelines, the MedOANET project delivered guidelines for Research Funders, where you can find information specifically on:

  • the main concepts and issues with respect to open access,
  • the major steps that are necessary in the process of policy development,
  • the important components of an institutional and funder policy,
  • model policies for research performing and research funding organizations
  • best practices in policy development for research performing and research funding organizations.

http://medoanet.eu/sites/www.medoanet.eu/files/documents/MED2013_GUIDELine_dp_EN_ws.pdf

Check out PASTEUR4OA (Open Access Policy Alignment Strategies for European Union Research) project Advocacy Resources. PASTEUR4OA develops and/or reinforces open access strategies and policies at the national level and facilitates their coordination among all Member States.

41 - What do we need from funders?

OpenAIRE would like to use a 'very limited' set of metadata fields from funders, no personal or private details are needed, e.g. no people's names, budget details:

  • PROJECT IDENTIFIER (MANDATORY)
  • PROJECT TITLE or ACRONYM (MANDATORY)
  • FUNDER NAME (MANDATORY), e.g. Wellcome Trust, EC
  • START DATE (MANDATORY),
  • END DATE (MANDATORY)
  • FUNDING STREAM(S) (OPTIONAL) – funding categories for more detailed statistics
  • ORGANIZATION(S) INVOLVED (OPTIONAL)

42 - Why does OpenAIRE want national funding information?

OpenAIRE supports the open access policy of the EC. This means that it gathers together the open access publications of the FP7 funding stream and moving on to Horizon 2020. For the first time, the EC can now view figures and detailed statistics on the research output associated with the funding that it provides. In turn this gives a figure for 'impact of funding', which can be viewed on the level of funding programme/stream/project. The services are currently being extended to include research data.

As well as the EC and ERC, OpenAIRE has run a pilot with Wellcome Trust and FCT project info, and is now ready to apply this model and its services to include additional funders at the national, or private/thematic level.

OpenAIRE

strategyWhat's new in the OpenAIRE2020 project?

43 - What is OpenAIRE?

The FP7 project OpenAIRE aimed to support the implementation of the EC and ERC Open Access policies. 

Its successor OpenAIREplus was aimed at linking the aggregated research publications to the accompanying research and project information, datasets and author information.

Open access to scientific peer reviewed publications has evolved from a pilot project with limited scope in FP7 to  an underlying principle in the Horizon 2020 funding scheme, obligatory for all H2020 funded projects.

The goal is to make as much European funded research output as possible available to all, via the OpenAIRE portal.

50 partners, from all EU countries, and beyond, work on OpenAIRE2020 project that aims to promote open scholarship and substantially improve the discoverability and reusability of research publications and data. The initiative brings together professionals from research libraries, open scholarship organisations, national e-Infrastructure and data experts, IT and legal researchers, showcasing the truly collaborative nature of this pan-European endeavor. A network of people, represented by the National Open Access Desks (NOADs), will organise activities to collect H2020 project outputs, and support research data management. Backing this vast outreach, is the OpenAIRE platform, the technical infrastructure that is vital for pulling together and interconnecting the large-scale collections of research outputs across Europe. The project will create workflows and services on top of this valuable repository content, which will enable an interoperable network of repositories (via the adoption of common guidelines), and easy upload into an all-purpose repository (via Zenodo).

OpenAIRE2020 will assist in monitoring H2020 research outputs and will be a key infrastructure for reporting H2020’s scientific publications as it will be loosely coupled to the EC’s IT backend systems. The EC’s Research Data Pilot will be supported through European-wide outreachfor best research data management practices and Zenodo, which will provide long-tail data storage. Other activities include: collaboration with national funders to reinforce the infrastructure’s research analytic services; an APC Gold OA pilot for FP7 publications with collaboration from LIBER; novel methods of review and scientific publishing withthe involvement of hypotheses.org; a study and a pilot on scientific indicators related to open access with CWTS’s assistance; legal studies to investigate data privacy issues relevant to the Open Data Pilot; international alignment with related networks elsewhere with the involvement of COAR.

44 - How can I participate?

Researchers working for European funded projects can participate by depositing their research output in a epository of their choice, publish in a participating Open Access journal, or deposit directly in the OpenAIRE repository ZENODO    – and indicating the project it belongs to in the metadata. Dedicated pages per project are visible on the OpenAIRE portal. 

Your research output, whether it is publications, datasets or project information is accessible through the OpenAIRE portal. Extra functionalities are also offered too, such as statistics, reporting tools and widgets – making OpenAIRE a useful support service for researchers, coordinators and project managers.

OpenAIRE relies heavily on a decentralized structure where there is a representation in all member states (the so-called NOADs – National Open Access Desks) who can give specialized advice. If you have a question about a country-specific situation, you can contact them through our Helpdesk system.  

Useful links:

Functionalities for Funders

Functionalities for Project Coordinators, Investigators and Officers

Functionalities for Research Managers

45 - What is Zenodo?

If you have no access to an OpenAIRE compliant repository, an institutional repository or a subject repository, Zenodo, hosted by CERN, will enable you to deposit your article and/or research data. Zenodo exposes its data to OpenAIRE, helping researchers to comply with the Open Access demands from the EC and the ERCs

46 - How is my project visible on the OpenAIRE portal?

OpenAIRE is not only the most reliable way to comply with the European Commission’s Open Access Policy, it also offers additional services for researchers and project coordinators.

By depositing your work in a repository and adding project information to the metadata, project information and related publications and data will autmatically become visible on the OpenAIRE portal. OpenAIRE aggregates research output from repositories and makes them visible on the OpenAIRE portal.

On this portal, each project has a dedicated page featuring:
  • Project information
  • App & Widget box
  • Publication list
  • Datasets
  • Author information

When the research output is available in Open Access, users can access them directly through the portal. 

47 - What are the NOADs (National Open Access Desk)?

The National Open Access Desks connect researchers, research institutions, and policy makers at a national level on the one end, and the OpenAIRE project services on the other. The focus of the National Open Access Desks activities is on support for compliance with the EC Open Access policies.

National Open Access Desks can help you find the appropriate repository in your country, and can answer your questions concerning Open Access, OpenAIRE, copyright issues, any special national rules and regulations concerning Open Access, and so on. They will redirect questions if necessary, especially when national issues, like copyright, are involved. You can contact them through our helpdesk.

For accessing the NOADs Information and Dissemination Kit, please  click here.

48 - How can my research be identified?

Beneficiaries must also ensure open access to the bibliographic metadata that identify the deposited publication. Correct identification of the publication is necessary for aggregating and linking research output to projects, author information and related datasets. When the work is correctly described, OpenAIRE can harvest the work from local repositories and link it to other information.

The bibliographic metadata must be in a standard format and must include all of the following:

  • the terms ["European Union (EU)" and "Horizon 2020"]["Euratom" and Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018"];
  • the name of the action, acronym and grant number;
  • the publication date, and length of embargo period if applicable, and
  • a persistent identifier.

Your local repository manager can help out with this. If any further questions arise, you can contact your local NOAD through our helpdesk.

49 - Can I edit or remove my publication once it's on the OpenAIRE portal?

OpenAIRE does not create content, but aggregates content (publications and data) from other sources.

  • If you have deposited your publication or dataset in a repository, you should contact the administrator of the specific repository
  • If you haven't deposited the publication or dataset yourself, or if you don't know how the record ended up on the OpenAIRE portal, contact the OpenAIRE helpdesk.

50 - What are OpenAIRE guidelines and where can I find them?

Our guidelines are especially created to share OpenAIRE’s work on interoperability and to engage with the community of OpenAIRE users. Researchers, repository managers, journal editors, data providers will all find guides tailored to their needs, allowing them to participate in the OpenAIRE community.

Visit the OpenAIRE wiki for the most recent guidelines.

51 - Can OpenAIRE be harvested?

Yes it can be harvested. OpenAIRE implements the OAI-PMH protocol. For more, please visit this link


FP7 post-grant Open Access publishing funds

The basics about the European Commission’s post-grant Open Access Pilot and how to apply for funding.

52 - How to apply for funding?

"The OpenAIRE central service for funding requests at https://postgrantoapilot.openaire.eu collects requests for funding from eligible FP7 projects. Researchers can request funds either directly through this system, or ask their project coordinator pr research library staff to submit on their behalf.

Upon every submission, the project coordinator will get notified via an automated e-mail - if necessary, they can object to the funding via an e-mail  to the pilot.

Institutions and research libraries have been briefed about this pilot and can help out with submission and eligibility criteria. 

53 - Until when will the FP7 Post-Grant Open Access Pilot run?

The first phase of the pilot, which was set to end on April 30th, 2017, has been extended with another 10 months. This means that the pilot will continue until February 28th, 2018. As this is an extension, the conditions and eligibility criteria remain the same and will be applied for the whole duration of the Pilot.

54 - What are the criteria to be eligible?

  • Projects are eligible to receive funding after the project has ended and up to 2 years after the project official end date.
  • A maximum of 3 publications per project can be funded throughout the entire pilot.
  • The maximum funding amount for an article, book chapter or conference proceedings is 2000€ and 6000€ for a book.
  • We do not fund hybrid journals.
  • The funding by the European Commission needs to be acknowledged in the metadata of the article (mentioning the article acronym and the grant number).
  • The Pilot is not aimed at retroactively reimbursing fees for papers that have been published already - request for funding should ideally happen upon acceptance of the manuscript.
  • A suitable invoice needs to be provided.
For more information on each criterium, please consult the other questions in this FAQ or contact the FP7 Pilot contact point

55 - What journals can I publish in?

Researchers are free to publish where they want, but in order to be eligible for funding from this post-grant OA Pilot, the journal will need to be a fully Open Access one. Publications submitted to hybrid journals are not supported by the Pilot (hybrid journals are those which do not offer all their content Open Access, but only the articles where a specific fee has been paid for the purpose, while keeping the rest of them under a subscription model).

56 - What are 'hybrid' journals and how do I recognise them?

Hybrid journals are journals which do not offer all their content Open Access, but only the articles where a specific fee has been paid for the purpose, while keeping the rest of them under a subscription model. Usually, these journals offer authors the choice to publish either Open Access or in the  traditional subscription model. The Pilot does not support this type of journals as they generate revenue from both the article processing charges and the subscription fees. 

Hybrid journals will not be listed in Open Access Journals aggregator sites such as https://doaj.org.

If you don’t know whether a journal is a hybrid or a fully Open Access one, please check with your Library or Research Office, your National Open Access Desk (NOAD) or send a question to the FP7 Post-Grant OA Pilot contact point.

57 - How many publications can I submit?

"There is a maximum of 3 publications, regardless of the type, per project - and this for the entire duration of the Pilot, including the extension. Once 3 publications have been approved, any following submission will receive a notification that it is not eligible anymore.

The Pilot reviewers deals with submissions on a 'first come, first serve' basis - once the '3 publications approved' treshold has been reached, submission is not possible anymore. Therefore, it is advisable to check with the project coordinator which publications should be submitted before applying for funding.

As the project coordinator gets notified of each submitted, they will get the final say when there are more than 3 publications submitted at the same time. 

There is no limitation as to the amount of publications per researchers, coordinator or institution. 

58 - What is the maximum funding amount?

"The maximum funding amount for an article is 2000€ and 6000€ for a book.This funding cap has not been chosen arbitrary, and is in line with many international OA funding schemes.

If the invoice states another currency, the system will convert the amount to €

If the processing charge exceeds this amount, you are encouraged to notify your publisher about this funding scheme and ask for a discount to meet with this funding cap.

If a lowering of the fee is not possible, researchers may claim the maximum available funding from the Pilot and consider using other funds to cover the remainder. A specific invoicing procedure will need to be applied in this case, either by having the invoice split between the Pilot and the institution, or by paying for the full fee upfront from the institution and issuing a reimbursement invoice limited to the cap to OpenAIRE. The submission dashboard offers the possiblity to indicate split funding.

59 - When are publications eligible for funding?

The FP7 Post-Grant Open Access Pilot policy guidelines state that eligible FP7 projects are those "finished no longer than two years ago at funding request submission time". 

"Projects are eligible to receive funding after the project has ended and up to 2 years after the project official end date (based on project information in the CORDIS database http://cordis.europa.eu).

If the project is no longer eligible to receive funding, there will be a notification upon submission. This can be overruled by the administrator if the acceptance and invoice date prove that the publication falls within the eligibility window, despite the date of submisson falling out of it.

Occasional exceptions may be made to this rule when a project was extended or had an early termination. Please get in contact with us in order to suggest a system update if this is the case for your project.

The funding needs to be requested upon acceptance of the manuscript. The Pilot is not aimed at retroactively reimbursing fees for papers that have been published already.

"

60 - What kind of information will be requested upon submission of a funding claim?

The system will request information about the FP7 project and the publication metadata. A lot of this information can and will be generated automatically from the OpenAIRE databases and, if possible, via the doi provided. An invoice and the necessary bank information will need to be provided as well.

61 - How does the invoicing/reimbursement work?

A submission will only be approved when a suitable invoice, with correct bank information, is attached to the request.

Ideally, you request from the publisher that they address the invoice to OpenAIRE, using the following billing information:

"Athena" Research Centre
Artemidos 6 & Epidavrou
GR-151 25, Athens - GREECE
Phone: +30 210 6875 300 Fax +30 210 6875 485
VAT NUMBER: EL999723442

If the publisher has already issued an invoice but this has not been paid yet, a simple request to update the invoice with ARC billing information is usually sufficient. Simply attach this updated version to the record. (see example below)

If your institution has already paid the invoice and you require a reimbursement, OpenAIRE needs a combined pdf document with the original invoice and a 'request for reimbursement' from your institution to Athena Research Centre (same information as above). Make sure that the bank information entered in the submission form is your institution's and not the publisher (as they have already been paid)!

Invoices and requests for reimbursement should always mention our VAT number, but can under no circumstance contain VAT.

Regardless of whether the invoice has already been paid, a funding request should always be submitted through the central system for any payment to be made from the FP7 Post-Grant OA Pilot.

apc payments openaire example

62 - What if the invoice has already been paid for by me or my institution?

If your institution has already paid the invoice and you require a reimbursement, OpenAIRE needs a combined pdf document with the original invoice and a 'request for reimbursement' from your institution to Athena Research Centre, using the following billing information:

"Athena" Research Centre
Artemidos 6 & Epidavrou
GR-151 25, Athens - GREECE
Phone: +30 210 6875 300 Fax +30 210 6875 485
VAT NUMBER: EL999723442

Make sure that the bank information entered is your institution's and not the publisher (as they have already been paid!)

Invoices and requests for reimbursement should always mention our VAT number, but can under no circumstance contain VAT.

Regardless of whether the invoice has already been paid, a funding request should always be submitted through the central system for any payment to be made from the FP7 Post-Grant OA Pilot."

63 - What if the publishing fee exceeds the 2000€/6000€ cap that has been set by the Pilot?

If the processing charge exceeds this amount, you are encouraged to notify your publisher about this funding scheme and ask for a discount to meet with this funding cap.
This funding cap has not been chosen arbitrary, and is in line with many international OA funding schemes.

If a lowering of the fee is not possible, researchers may claim the maximum available funding from the Pilot and consider using other funds to cover the remainder. A specific invoicing procedure will need to be applied in this case, either by having the invoice split between the Pilot and the institution, or by paying for the full fee upfront from the institution and subsequently issuing a reimbursement invoice to OpenAIRE. The submission dashboard offers the possiblity to indicate split funding.

64 - What are the technical requirements for book publishers and which publishers are eligible?

The first time a funding request arrives for publishing a monograph, edited volume or conference proceedings with a publisher that hasn't been funded before, a list of five questions is sent out to the book author/editor so that they're jointly answered by the author and the publisher. These technical requirements must be met in order for a funding request for a book to be accepted. Besides this, it's always useful to provide a link to any Open Access book that the publisher may have published previously in order to double-check the publishing standards that were applied to it.

  • Will a DOI be provided to the book upon publication?
  • Will the FP7 project be acknowledged in the book?
  • What CC licence will the book be published under?
  • The policy guidelines for this funding initiative mention the requirement to make available a text-minable version (ideally an XML version) besides the standard PDF one. For books, Epub could be an alternative to XML, but some text-minable version should be made available.
  • There is a requirement in the guidelines to have the final version of the funded output deposited in an OpenAIRE-compliant repository. Could we confirm if the publisher is able to do this on its own, and otherwise, if there would be any problem with our depositing it ourselves?

Publishers in the list below have already been checked for compliance with the technical requirements, so a funding request for publishing a book with them would be directly accepted if the standard eligibility criteria are met. There are of course many other eligible book publishers, but before agreeing to fund a specific book we would first need to check whether they meet these specific requirements. When a book publisher is not featured in this list, the project reviewer will ask for a confirmation of the publisher that they will meet our technical requirements. 

  • Amsterdam University Press
  • EDP Sciences Forum
  • Editrice Universitaria Udinese
  • InTech International Water Association (IWA)
  • IOS Press
  • Liverpool University Press
  • Multilingual Matters
  • Policy Press
  • River Publishers
  • Rumbo Sur
  • Silva Slovenica
  • Springer
  • Taylor & Francis/Routledge
  • Ubiquity Press
  • University of Manchester Press
  • Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU)

65 - Is an 'accepted pending minor revisions' notification enough for submitting a funding request?

This FP7 Post-Grant Open Access Pilot is typically asking for a funding request to be submitted upon manuscript acceptance. However, in cases where the final acceptance date may be very close to the limit of the project eligibility time-window it may be possible to submit a funding request a bit earlier so that we'll be able to take the invoice when it's made available upon final manuscript acceptance even if it's a bit beyond
the 2-year deadline for the project eligibility. This should always be checked with the coordination of the initiative at postgrantpilotinfo [at] openaire.eu, and we will always ask for the 'accepted pending minor revisions' notification to be shared with us before agreeing to take a funding request.

66 - Will the Pilot provide funding for already published papers from eligible FP7 projects?

No it won’t. The Pilot aims to collect the funding requests at publication acceptance time in order to be able to put together a live request database and negotiate the best possible deals for their funding with publishers.

67 - Which publishers have a pre-payment agreement with OpenAIRE and how does it work?

OpenAIRE has now signed pre-payment agreements with BioMed Central, BMJ, Copernicus, Ubiquity Press and Wiley on behalf of the EC FP7 Post-Grant Open Access Pilot. These will allow APCs for eligible articles published in any of their fully Open Access journals to be charged to the pre-paid account upon manuscript acceptance. In case the publisher has them in their portfolio, submissions in hybrid journals will not be accepted. 

Some publishers share information with us on submitted manuscripts which have acknowledged FP7 projects, but not all of them are able to do it. To ensure that your request will be processed and transferred to the publisher pre-paid fund, it is advised to submit a request through our system, but you don't need to upload an invoice. Upon revision, the reviewer will notify the publisher that the publication can be moved to the pre-paid fund. 

The same requirements apply to this type of funding than through the regular system.

68 - Are ERC grants and Marie Curie actions eligible for this funding?

Yes, as part of the FP7’s IDEAS resp. PEOPLE program they are eligible for reimbursement of post-grant OA publishing fees.

69 - What kind of document types will be eligible for funding?

The post-grant OA Pilot funding will cover research articles, contributions to conference proceedings, book chapters and monographs, and data and software publications. All these need to be peer-reviewed publications to be eligible for funding.

70 - Who decides whether a funding request is accepted?

Funding request eligibility will be subject to specific criteria, both administrative and technical. Verification of such criteria will be automatic wherever possible, eg provided that the FP7 project end-date makes it eligible and that the requested funding falls within the Pilot´s funding threshold. In case of doubt a manual validation will be carried out.

71 - Is there a list of the book publishers that the Pilot has funded so far?

Yes there is, please find it below. Book publishers need to meet a specific set of technical requirements we check with them the first time a funding request arrives for publishing a monograph, edited volume or conference proceedings with them. Publishers in the list below have already been checked for compliance with the technical requirements, so a funding request for publishing a book with them would be directly accepted if the standard eligibility criteria are met. There are of course many other eligible book publishers, but before agreeing to fund a specific book we would first need to check whether they meet these specific requirements.

  • Amsterdam University Press
  • Editpress
  • EDP Sciences
  • Forum Editrice Universitaria Udinese
  • InTech
  • International Water Association (IWA)
  • IOS Press
  • Liverpool University Press
  • Multilingual Matters
  • Policy Press
  • River Publishers
  • Rumbo Sur
  • Silva Slovenica
  • Springer
  • Taylor & Francis/Routledge
  • Ubiquity Press
  • University of Manchester Press
  • Vilnius Gediminas Technical University (VGTU)

The list will be kept updated as new Open Access books get funded.

72 - What additional technical requirements will the post-grant OA Pilot issue?

Final versions of the publications will need to be deposited into an OpenAIRE-compliant repository or in Zenodo. Publishers should deal with this requirement whenever possible, but the institutions or the researchers themselves may also perform the deposit. More information on which version to deposit, together with a number of additional technical requirements, is available in the post-grant OA Pilot policy guidelines.

If not done so upon submisson, permanent identifiers (such as doi's and repository links) can always be added to the record after approval.

73 - How do I submit a funding request for a book if I only have an agreement with a publisher but not a date of acceptance yet?

The acceptance process for books is often different from the one that's followed for research articles, with a final date of acceptance not being available until the peer-review of the manuscript has been performed. If you have an early-stage agreement with a publisher, the FP7 Post-Grant OA Pilot will collect the data for the FP7 project and the publication and store it in its records (including the estimated final date of acceptance) and keep the funding available for the time when the monograph or edited volume is accepted for publication.

The design of the central system at https://postgrantoapilot.openaire.eu/ was specifically updated to be able to handle these early-stage requests from book authors, editors or publishers.

74 - Will there be a specific licence requirement for publications to be funded by the post-grant OA Pilot?

Yes, depending on the document type. An open content licence will always be required, ideally a Creative Commons CC BY or CC BY-SA license.

75 - Are Horizon 2020 projects eligible for funding?

No. As the European Commission Open Access to Publication policy has become mandatory at the start of Horizon 2020, any potential publishing costs should have been incorporated in the project budget. This is not the case for most FP7 projects, which may have started before the policy became mandatory.

76 - Can I request funding for an article in a journal that has not been released yet?

Yes – although it’s not the ideal way to proceed. If an acceptance notice has been collected for a manuscript, the funding request will be taken provided that the to-be OA journal meets the Pilot’s technical requirements on peer-review, licensing and file versions among others. All these details will need to be checked with the journal editors before the request gets approved.

The recommended way to proceed is to wait until the journal is live before submitting a funding request. However, a notification of the manuscript acceptance via email is encouraged in such cases.