Institutional Policy

A couple of Dutch universities – Erasmus University Rotterdam (since 2010), Eindhoven University of Technology (2015), TU Delft (2016)  and University of Groningen (2017) – have adopted an official open access policy for their institution. Almost all universities stipulate that PhD dissertations must be made publicly available in their repositories.

The universities of Twente, Utrecht and Delft encourage open access publishing through a special fund. VU University Amsterdam and Utrecht University and TU Delft support researchers wishing to set up open access journals.
 
Dutch universities make great efforts to inform their academic staff about open access via web pages, special newsletters and the like. Symposiums and a range of other activities are held across the country each year during international Open Access Week.­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­

See for more information the national website on open access: openacces.nl.

Institutional Policy

Some institutions have open access mandates requiring authors to self-archive their papers in their institutional repository: 23 French institutions are listed in ROARmap.
The CNRS, the main research institution in France has adopted a strong open science policy in November 2019.
 

Institutional Policy

Izmir Institute of Technology (IZTECH) Open Science Policy which based on OpenAIRE model policy on Open Science for Research Performing Organisations (RPOs), was approved by IZTECH Senate on 26 March 2019. This policy, which is the first Open Science Policy in Turkey, includes details on both publications and research data. This policy was also sent to other Turkish universities as a model policy by CoHE.
 
Some institutions have voted open access mandates requiring that authors self-archive their papers in their own institutional repository: 95 Turkish institutions are listed in ROARmap.

Institutional Policy

  • ROARMAP lists 19 open access mandates in Belgium, either on the funder or on the institutional level. At present OpenDOAR list 36 Belgian repositories.
  • The number of Open Access publications in university repositories is steadily increasing. This can be linked to the sustain awareness-raising initiatives and training sessions organised by the universities.
  • All universities who have Open Access repositories are compatible with OpenAIRE except one, with an Immediate Deposit/Optional Open Access (ID/OA) Mandate. They regularly organise in-house training sessions on Open Access. Some universities already have research data management strategies and plans in place.
  • To stimulate exchange of good practices and expertise a working group on open science and research data management has been established within the Flemish Interuniversity Council (VLIR).
  • KULeuven installed, as a pilot, a FAIR open access fund to stimulate researchers to publish in full open access journals with a reasonable APC. Part of the pilot is also an open access book fund.

Institutional Policy

In November 2008 the Senate of the University of Cyprus, supported and accepted the Library Committee’s proposal to sign the Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities. Berlin declaration was also signed in 2011 by the Governing board of the Cyprus University of Technology and in 2017 by the Open University of Cyprus.

In addition, the forming of Institutional Policies are now in progress in Cyprus in the biggest universities of the country. In particular, Open Access committee has been formed by the University of Cyprus to handle the issue and propose any necessary actions and tasks needed to adopt and implement the institutional policy. Other Universities are also discussing in different levels and bodies the introduction of an institutional OA policy.

 

Institutional Policy

University of Iceland issued a policy in February 2014. Where staff is encouraged to publish articles in open access outlets, such as OA journals, archives, preprint databases et.  For more information please click here. For more about, please click here. See also ROARmap link.

Reykjavik University issued a policy in November 2014 where academic employees are encouraged to publish scholarly articles in open access and thus make them accessible free of charge and free of licencing restrictions See also ROAR link

Bifröst UniversityBifröst University issued an open access policy in May 2011 where academic staff is encouraged to publish in open access either by means of open-access journals or open-access archives. The National and University Library of Iceland issued a policy on open access and open science in November 2016. For more information please click here.

Institutional Policy

The Conference of Rectors of the Portuguese Universities (CRUP) has recommended to the Portuguese research funding organisations to implement a policy of mandatory depositing of the research output. CRUP generally supports the EUA Working Group recommendations. At the national level there are several institutional mandates, currently 26 see ROARMAP.

 

Institutional Policy

Research institutions in Croatia are autonomous, but they strongly rely on national policies and regulations. There are only a few institutional OA mandates, such as those of the RBI, SRCE, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture of the University of Zagreb, and the Physics Department of the Faculty of Science at the University of Zagreb, mostly addressing OA to publications. Only SRCE’s OA policy includes research and other data management.

Croatian research institutions can use a national repository infrastructure DABAR to maintain their FAIR compliant OA institutional digital repositories free of charge. Researchers from institutions without their own repository can use thematic or other large-scale repositories like Zenodo, FigShare, or others. Some institutions still maintain their own digital repositories based on EPrints software.

Some institutions provide support for OA and ORDM activities for their researchers. The level of support varies and usually consists of infrastructure, training for using the infrastructure, and creation of DMPs.

To the best of our knowledge, ORDM and/or FAIR are not systematically rewarded by institutions, but some reward OA to publications.

Institutional Policy

Open Access is more of an individual effort, than the result of institutional support or policy. In general for almost all digital repositories: metadata reuse permitted for not-for-profit purposes and rights vary for the reuse of full data items.

Institutional Policy

An increasing number of research institutions are developing their own institutional policies to foster the adoption of open access practices, aligned with the State-level legislation and the EU mandate (Horizon 2020). Whether in the form of institutional declarations, recommendations or compulsory requirements, institutions are taking determined steps towards open access. Currently, following the information at ROARMAP, 44 institutions in Spain have already published any open access policy. Further information about Spanish institutional policies can be found at  RECOLECTA.

The main research institution in Spain, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), includes as part of its strategy and action an open access mandate to publications and research data; in addition, open access is considered as one of the variables assess productivity of its research institutes (an English version of the document is also available). Universities and other research centres have open access policies that encourage or request open access to publications.

Nevertheless, there are still differences in the implementation degree among universities and PROs. Despite the fact that in Spain the open access principles are widely accepted among all the relevant stakeholders, there is a high degree of decentralization and differentiation of decision-making agents to take into consideration when policies and mandates are being discussed.

Follow the link for more information about the regional and universities institutional policies.

The FECYT Strategic Plan 2019-2022 includes the specific strategic goal #4 aiming to consolidate access to scientific knowledge, which lists several activities to provide access to scientific information and transition to open access, promote the interoperability of digital information infrastructures, and to participate in the measurement of science and innovation.

Institutional Policy

Besides the SNSF, several Swiss academic research institutions have installed Open Access mandates concerning scholarly publications by their researchers. Additionally, the national action plan envisaged the creation of recommendations for the remaining Swiss higher education institutions. The Swiss Library Network for Education and Research (SLiNER) has drawn up a set of guidelines. The document is intended to help develop Open Access policies. It also provides an opportunity to check and discuss policies that have already been introduced. The adherence of the individual policies to joint principles based on international standards will ensure that Open Access is implemented consistently across all institutions, funding organisations and publishing houses. Institutional policies can be viewed in the Registry of Open Access Repositories Mandatory Archiving Policies (ROARMAP).

Institutional Policy

Atlas of Open Science and Research in Finland 2019 is an evaluation of the openness of Finnish research organisations, research-funding organisations, academic and cultural institutes abroad and learned societies and academies completed by the Ministry of Education and Culture. It states about the policies of:

  • publications: “About 80 % of the higher education institutions have principles which recommend or encourage the use of open-access channels for publishing and more than 60 % require the use of open-access channels. Nearly all (93 %) of the universities and 88 % of the universities of applied sciences have recommendations on self-archiving publications in institutional or other repositories. Of the HEIs, 60 % require self-archiving research publications and has a support process place for it.”
  • methods: “Compared to the previous evaluation, there has been significant improvements in developing the principles for the openness of research methods (including algorithms and code). Openness of research methods is surprisingly well managed in policies and almost all of the universities and more than 70 % of the universities of applied sciences have policies and principles for this. Almost half of the universities and about 40 % of the universities of applied sciences require openness of research methods.”
  • research data: “The availability, use and licensing of research data is also very well managed. Every university has a data policy and implementation plan recommending openness of research data, whereas eight universities of applied sciences have not yet set principles for open research data. Ten out of thirteen universities and almost half of the universities of applied sciences require open licensing of research data and use of agreed open repositories."

ROARMAP lists 33 open access mandates in Finland, either on the funder or on the institutional level, and OpenDOAR lists 22 Finnish repositories.

Institutional Policy

All major universities have policies or strategies with recommendations to publish their research results in open access. Almost all other HEIs also have similar recommendations for open access. Four HEIs have Open Access mandates; these include Blekinge Institute of Technology, Chalmers University of Technology, Malmö University and Umeå University.
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